Social Media Round Up

As we grow, we also evolve into slightly different people than we were the day before. Throughout this course, I have found blogging to be  a new fun experience which I have thoroughly enjoyed. Before I took this course, I had never blogged, so I didn’t really know what to expect, or how my writing should look. I soon learned that I didn’t have to write for paragraphs on end, (although I certainly did that in several blogs).

My blogs changed significantly.

I learned my blogs could look like one big paragraph,(blog #5 “Watching TV Makes You Smarter”) or  concise paragraphs connected with the common thread of my opinion coupled with the guidelines of each blogs, (blog #11 “Georgia O’Keeffe”.)

A vital lesson I learned from blogging is how to correctly include in-text citations. In high school, I was horrible at in-text citations in my papers. I just couldn’t get it. However, this semester, it finally clicked, even in my first blog, and I continued to use the correct format in future blogs.

From blog #1 “Us and Them”  David Sedaris wrote, “To say that you did not believe in television was different from saying that you did not care for it. Belief implied that television had a master plan and that you were against it” (803).

What I will remember most about my blogging experience is that I am no longer afraid to voice my opinions. I am a quiet person, I found blogging to be cathartic, as well as the simple activity of typing therapeutic.  And after each blog is completed, I can reread it and find at least one or two sentences which I am truly proud of. The following are such sentences from each blog to date:

Blog #1 “Us and Them”  by David Sedaris: “David Sedaris’ parents weren’t TV fanatics, but they obviously accepted the concept into their homes, if not to hear the nightly news, but also not to be ostracized by their neighbors.”

Blog #2 “When I Was A Child” by Lillian Smith: “In general, I believe that Lillian Smith’s parents thought of their children as The Future, but they themselves were not brave enough to go against their community’s beliefs on segregation, and therefore could not prove to their children that social change is possible and that this kind of change is acceptable–that you won’t be thought less of for believing in something that is not the social norm of your neighbor, something that would be considered by most: Radical.”

Blog #3 “Grief” by Joan Didion: “Didion has become so comfortable with geology and natural disasters that she even prefers her death and that of her husband to be caused by one, rather than accept the death of her husband in a normal way, (most likely because she can’t bear the pain of life without her husband.)

Blog #4 “Powder” by Tobias Wolff: “With few words, father and son are able to convey to each other that getting home, even if it means driving on a closed road, during horrible weather conditions, with a fleet of troopers waiting to stop and reprimand them at the end of their journey…. That breaking all the rules is OK,  if they get to spend a few more hours together; that time in each other’s company is precious and should never be wasted. That sometimes, it’s worth taking a risk.”

Blog#5 “Watching TV Makes You Smarter” by Steven Johnson: “Complexity is essential in modern television shows, for intelligent viewers, otherwise they loose interest. ”

“In general, there is less hand-holding between the viewer and the writers; the script speaks for itself. Viewers today want to watch TV shows that are varied.”

Blog #6 “What’s the Matter with Kids Today?” by Amy Goldwasser: “Amy Goldwasser’s argument is that parents of today’s generation of teenagers are fearful of the power that the Internet holds over their children’s capabilities. Parents don’t trust the Internet because it is something they didn’t grow up with, therefore they don’t understand or approve of their kids fervent use of the it.”

Blog #7  “Whodunit–The Media? ” by Maggie Cutler: “The constant viewing of movies and TV shows that extol the lives of ‘kickass heroines’ and machine-gun-wielding heroes has become the norm for children, as well as their heroes’ language and appalling behavior, that it’s no wonder kids today are not becoming the lovely little cherubs that they were a generation ago.’

Blog #8 “The Occupy Movement: Economic Injustice and Civil Protest” by Caleb Eick: “Eick uses real-life, personal, relevant examples throughout his essay to enforce the fact that the middle class is shirking, the wealth that manages to exist in the current economy is unfairly distributed among CEOs, that the government isn’t doing as nearly much as it should to enforce regulation on corporations, and that the current economic cycle of booms and crises is not healthy, effective, or a good solution, and therefore it must be restructured for the future.”

Blog #9 “Music Education in Public Schools” by Brian Picente: “If all students were as fortunate as I was, to have teachers like Mrs. Abbattista and Mr. Farrell that made learning about music the highlight of every student’s day, music education would never be a question in public schools–music courses would be a requirement.

Blog #10 “Johnny Depp: Unlikely Superstar” by Sean Smith: “Smith’s article shows society who Johnny Depp really is, not the one that has been concocted by critics and naysayers. ”

Blog #11 “Georgia O’Keeffe” by Joan Didion: “In Joan Didion’s profile of Georgia O’Keeffe, the great artist is beautifully portrayed as a weathered old soul, who has been battered by her endless critics and came out the victor.”

“Crustiness is one adjective Didion uses to describe O’Keeffe, and I must say I concur that to have such a word applied to a person would normally incite a recoil, however it made me nod in agreement, as if no other word could better describe such a woman.”

“O’Keeffe bled her character onto every one of her canvases, in every conversation or lack thereof, in every look and tone of voice. She told her contemporaries and the world how she felt, where she stood on the current technique: that she was going to continue on with her work in her way, and that was the way she would always paint and live.”

I close with noting that the last quote I included from blog #11, is my absolute favorite.

 

Georgia O’Keeffe Paintings

I have decided to create a post of a few paintings by the great Georgia O’Keeffe.

okeefe_                                                  Georgia O'Keeffea-sunflower-from-maggie                                                  pedernal               282882420313693166RHP2FhAmc                                                                       1335324391_georgia-o-keeffe-red-poppy-81942024yellowsweetpeas

“Georgia O’Keeffe” by Joan Didion

In Joan Didion’s profile of Georgia O’Keeffe, the great artist is beautifully portrayed as a weathered old soul, who has been battered by her endless critics and came out the victor. It is O’Keeffe’s very words that direct her fans towards the correct path to appreciate her properly.  “Where I was born and where and how I lived is unimportant. . . It is what I have done with where I have been that should be of interest” (Didion 853).

Crustiness is one adjective Didion uses to describe O’Keeffe, and I must say I concur that to have such a word applied to a person would normally incite a recoil, however it made me nod in agreement, as if no other word could better describe such a woman.

A woman that didn’t care how the Impressionists did something. “At twenty-four she left all those opinions behind and went for the first time to live in Texas, where there were no trees to paint and no one to tell her how not to paint them” (858).

When Didion describes her daughter’s ‘unconscious but quite basic assumption’ of people and their profession, it hit me how I wish Didion’s daughter was right; that everyone’s work should reflect themselves. “She was assuming that the glory she saw in the work reflected a glory in its maker, that the painting was the painter as the poem is the poet, that every choice one made alone — every word chosen or rejected, every brush stroke laid down or not laid down — betrayed one’s character. Style is character” (853).

I believe that unwittingly, today people do reflect themselves in their work, the quality they put into their job, the manner they interact with customers and colleagues.

O’Keeffe bled her character onto every one of her canvases, in every conversation or lack thereof, in every look and tone of voice. She told her contemporaries and the world how she felt, where she stood on the current technique: that she was going to continue on with her work in her way, and that was the way she would always paint and live.

Rosemary & Sea Salt Olive Oil Cookies

Chip Chip Hooray!

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Remain calm. You are, in fact, on the correct blog. These cookies are definitely unique–and very different from what you’re used to seeing on this blog. There’s no butter in them. No brown sugar. They’re downright savory cookies. But y’know, they happen to be Charlie’s hands-down favorite thing I’ve ever made. So I figured they warranted a blog appearance.

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Strawberries in Balsamic Caramel – Rethinking desserts

The Family Meal

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Since Olive started eating from the table, I’ve been 10x more mindful of what I serve for lunch and dinner.  I have re-thought the structure of a meal from the way we sit at the table to the kinds of  things we have for dessert.  Dessert is certainly not something that I grew up eating every night.  I’m not sure any of us did.  I think there are a couple reasons for this.  For one, American versions of desserts are really sweet and really indulgent, for the most part.  And usually really big.  So naturally, we don’t think of desserts as something you should have every night, which is inherently a good thing, but it’s caused us to view things like fruits in nearly the same category as vegetables: something we HAVE to eat, or are too expensive to eat, or aren’t very exciting to eat.  I think most people would feel…

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Candied Bacon Maple Cookies

Tastefully Tuesday

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I feel like there is so much that could be said about this post.

First, I really like bacon.

So, there’s that.

My husband and I live near an excellent German grocer called Gene’s Sausage Shop. They specialize in meats and deli cuts (and all things delicious).

I think about a Christmas shopping seasons where mothers were literally trampling over each other to get their child a “Tickle-Me-Elmo.”

I thought to myself, “It is just a toy. What a group of crazy women.”

I could elbow someone out of the way if it ruined my chances of getting bacon from their deli counter. Clearly you see what my priorities are…

So the bacon is delicious.

But the maple syrup used for the bacon topping is really what makes this treat special.

Jen is a New Englander and, while I spare no time making fun of her for saying “wicked”, she…

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So Delicious Ice Cream Cake – Recipe Contest!

simplydish

March 23rd, 2013 012

This is so exciting… So Delicious Dairy Free has teamed up with Go Dairy Free for a great recipe contest!

Find the details here:  http://www.godairyfree.org/news/so-delicious-dairy-free-recipe-contest

The official voting is done on Pinterest at http://www.pinterest.com/godairyfree/so-delicious-dairy-free-2013-recipe-contest

The recipe with the most LIKES wins!  And we’d sure appreciate a ‘like’ on that pinterest board!  🙂

SO fun!

This was a birthday cake that was a special, specific order from a special young man… so fantastic and SO easy!

For the crust…

Layer whole oreo cookies (alternatives listed below) on the bottom of a parchment lined springform pan.

You can fill in the spots with pieces of cookies.

A great alternative to an oreo cookie would be Newman-O’s or Late July cookies (we love Late July) … if you do choose to use oreo cookies, know that they are in fact dairy-free.

Take out your ‘So Delicious’ vanilla bean non-dairy frozen dessert (or you…

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